Encyclopedia > Town Český Krumlov > History of the town of Český Krumlov

History of Street Names in Český Krumlov

Náměstí Svornosti:
The first written mention is dated from 1443 when the square was known as the market-place. This term was used even in the 16th century and in the first half of the 17th century. Afterwards the square was renamed in German - the Ringplatz and was called by this name even in 1915. At present it is stated as náměstí Svornosti (Square of Svornosti) The word svornost in Czech signifies union, accord.

Square in Český Krumlov, in the background is Church of St. Vitus with Baroque tower from 1893 , historical photo

Horní ulice:
The first written mention about Horní ulice, or Upper Street, occurred in 1511. From the 16th until the first half of 17th century it was called Horní ulice. Afterwards it was renamed in German to the Obere Gasse and from 1909 until 1918 it was called the Roseggergasse in honour of a Styer poet Petr Rosegger. Then it was again renamed Obere Gasse and today it is known as Horní ulice.

Horní no.  159 - Kaplanka, view onto Horní Street, historical photo, foto: F.Wolf Horní Street in Český Krumlov, in the front of the picture buliding Horní no. 159 - Kaplanka, foto: Libor Sváček


Kostelní ulice:
The first written mention about this lane below the school occured in 1543. In the 16th century it was known as houses below the school or houses below the church. In the 19th century it was called Kirchengasse. Since 1915 it was known as Kirchengasse or Kostelní ulice, translation Church St.

Crossroads of  Kostelní and Židovská Streets in Český Krumlov, foto: Libor Sváček

Šatlavská ulice:
From the 16th century this street was called the houses behind the old Rathaus (old town hall square No.3) then as the Frohnfestgasse in 19th century. In 1915 it was known under the name of Frohnfestgasse (Frohnvest - public prison). Since 1918 it has been known as Šatlavská ulice. Šatlava is an old term for jail in Czech.

Šatlavská Street in Český Krumlov, view with Castle Tower, photo from 1965, foto: Karel Mrázek Šatlavská Street in Český Krumlov, foto: Libor Sváček


Radniční ulice:
Between the 16th and 17th centuries it was called the street from Latrán to the market-place or from the market-place to Latrán by walking. From the 18th until the beginning of the 19th century it was called the Kasgasse. From the end of 19th century until 1915 it was known as the Rathausgasse, then since 1918 has been known as ulice Radniční, or Town Hall St.

Radniční Street in Český Krumlov, historical photo by Josef Seidl View of Radniční Street in Český Krumlov, historical photo


Masná ulice:
From the 16th to 17th century it was called the houses at meat shops ( History of Meat Market in Český Krumlov) then as the Fleischgasse in the 19th century. Under this name it was known even in 1915. Afterwards it was, and is, known as Masná ulice, which translates into Butcher's St.

View onto Masná and Šatlavská Street in Český Krumlov, historical photo ..


Kájovská ulice:
In the 16th and 17th centuries houses near No. 54 were known as Na louži, while houses nearby Kájovská Gate No. 62 were called "u Kájovské brány" (at the Kájov Gate), then as the Gojauergasse in 19th century. In 1915 it was known as the Gojauergasse. Afterwards it is known as Kájovská ulice, or Kájov St. Kájov is a village near Český Krumlov.

Kájovská no's.  60 and 61, historical photo Kájovská Street, remains of original Český Krumlov town walls, historical photo


Na louži:
At the beginning of 16th century this name occured for houses No. 54, 67, 68. Around about 1900 the street was called Dr. Nitscheplatz (in honour of Dr. Friedrich Nitzche, the notary in Vyšší Brod, a deputy and honoured man in his time). In 1915 it was known as the Dr. Nitscheplatz. Since 1918 it has been stated as Na louži. The name in Czech literally means "on the puddle".

Kájovská no.  54, Krčín's home before the Renaissance murals were uncovered, historical photo Kájovská no. 54, overview


Panská ulice:
Until the 18th century it had no name, then in the 19th century it was called Herrngasse. In 1915 it was known as the Nossbergergasse ( in honour of Matyáš Nossberger, a great local sponsor of the poor). After 1918 it was known as Panská ulice, or Men's St.

View down Dlouhá Street in Český Krumlov, historical photo

Široká ulice:
Between the 16th and 17th centuries it was called the lowland or back street, from 18th century it was known as the Breitegasse, and under this name it was stated even in 1915. Afterwards it was known as Široká ulice, Wide St.

Široká Street in Český Krumlov, foto: Libor Sváček

Široká Street in Český Krumlov, historical photo

Široká Street in Český Krumlov, in the foreground residents of the town, in the background is Český Krumlov Castle, historical photo

Široká Street in Český Krumlov, historical photo from above


Dlouhá ulice:
In the 16th century it was thought of as a continuation of Široká ulice (respectively lowland or back street). Between the 18th and 19th centuries it was known as Langegasse. Between 1902-1920 it was called Franz Khemeter Gasse (in honour of a chairman of Český Krumlov). After 1920 it is stated under the name Dlouhá ulice, Long St.

Vilém Fischer, view onto Dlouhá Street in Český Krumlov with building of Vlašský dvůr in foreground, watercolor ..


Soukenická ulice:
In the 16th century it was called the middle street then between the 18th and 19th centuries as Tuchmachergasse, even by this name in 1915. Then the name of Soukenická ulice, Draper's St., was stated.

Soukenická no. 36, street

Parkán:
The first written mention is from 1443. In the 16th century it was known as Parkán or Parkgraben, then between the 18th and 19th century as Parkgraben until 1915. Then it was known as Parkán - the word indicates an area between the outer city walls in medieval Czech language.

Parkán Street in Český Krumlov, foto: Libor Sváček .. Historical postcard with picture by  W. Fischer, 1935, collection of Regional Museum of National History in Český Krumlov


Na Ostrově:

From the 16th to the first half of the 17th century the name Na Ostrově was used, then in the 18th century as Am Werdi and in 19th century as Am Wirtl. In 1915 it was known as Am Wirtl and then as Na Ostrově. The name literally means "on the island".

Linecká ulice:
Between the 16th and 17th centuries it was known as Kájovské předměstí (Kájov suburb) then between the 18th and 19th centuries as Gottesackergasse. In 1915 it was stated as the Linzerstrasse and today as Linecká ulice.

Parkán Street in Český Krumlov, flooded, historical photo, foto: J.Seidel

Rybářská ulice:
In the first written mention it is stated as Rybářská ulice in 1528 then between 17th-20th centuries as Rybářská and Fischergasse alternately. In 1915 it was known under the name of Fischergasse. Today it is known as Rybářská ulice, meaning Fisherman's St.

View onto the Vltava River and Rybářská Street in Český Krumlov, historical photo

Plešivec:
This is a suburb as well as a street. From the 16th century it was known as Plešivec or Flechberg. In 1915 it was stated under the name of Flossberg, today as Plešivec. The word has a connotation towards bald-headedness.

Street in Plešivec area in Český Krumlov, town inhabitants, historical photo Plešivec quarter in Český Krumlov, view from the Vltava River, historical photo


Latrán:
This is a suburb as well as a street. The first mention was noted in a land and duties register of Rosenberg from the 1370's. It used to be stated in Czech as Latrán or in German as Latron by turns.

View onto lower part of Latrán Street in Český Krumlov, fountain in the foreground, historical photo Latrán no.  53, detail of ornamentation, historical photo, foto: J.Seidel Latrán, view from tower of the Church of St. Jošt


Zámecké schody:
In the 16th century they were called the Hofperk, then as the Schlosstiege in the 19th century and as the Hofstiege in 1915. Afterwards they were known as Zámecké schody, meaning Castle Stairs.

Castle steps in Český Krumlov, historical photo Castle steps in Český Krumlov, foto: Libor Sváček


Nové Město:
The name occured in 15th century . In German it is called the Neustadt (New Town).

V jámě:
The name first occured in the 16th century . (In the Pit).

Klášterní Street in Český Krumlov, foto: Libor Sváček

Klášterní:
The street didn't have its own name until the beginning of the 20th century. In 1915 it was stated under a name the Turkowizergasse (in honour of Austrian priest who was in service also in Český Krumlov who used to make financial donations to support poor students). Since 1918 it has been known as Klášterní ulice (Church St.).

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